bo i shanghai blogg

best when it employs Chinese ingredients to create its own rendition of French classics, such as their Shandong-inspired take on bouillabaisse, reworked with geoduck, langoustine, millet, and abalone. Excellent dish, especially with sweet shrimp (because I dont like fully cooked shrimp). Innovation, but at, bo, shanghai, its relevance begins and ends with its Shanghainese roots. Next was a dish based on Shangdong cuisine. In similar fashion, Wagyu beef was laid on top of a spiral of lychee purée and accompanied by pickled pearl onions and a sauce of Fujian red rice wine, creating an intriguing symphony of sweetness and tanginess. Guangdong: zongzi, black truffle, cepes, salted duck yolk, Sarrade ham.

Shanghai Girl Eats Bo Shanghai



bo i shanghai blogg

Bo i shanghai blogg
bo i shanghai blogg

This sounds odd but worked quite well, the basil flavour coming through nicely and the kick from the Tabasco reminiscent of a Bloody Mary cocktail (14/20). Here it took the form of a take on risotto, but influenced from the cooking of Guangdong. A take on bruschetta was a crisp topped with tomato, Hokkaido sea urchin and Italian olives with Chinese olive powder. Totally but I think there is a small audience for. The main element was bluefin tuna belly (otoro cooked with a blowtorch, served with a veal jus, along with seaweed with bagna cauda, pickled garlic shoots and a bread sauce made with wine, and a powder of the wine must. Given the length to which, bo, shanghai has gone to build a new concept and distinguish itself from its sibling, it was somewhat surprising to see it inherit the famous amuse-bouche. A tomato bread roll was served on the side. Jiangsu: crispy eel, barley, water chestnut, beurre fumet, termite mushroom. Service was good and both head chefs very engaging and happy to chat about the dishes in detail. A nine-year aged Acquarello rice was used, with fat from a particular breed of chicken known as three yellow chicken (due to its natural hue) used in place of butter. There was perhaps a tendency for dishes to have one component too many, but I have noticed over the years that younger chefs often do this, whereas as chefs gain experience they are more confident in stripping dishes down, thinking about what can be successfully.